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Posts from the ‘Egg Stands’ Category

Turkey Eggs

Ever wonder why you don’t see turkey eggs on the menu? Truth is, turkeys simply don’t lay that many eggs, and most people who breed turkeys collect the eggs and hatch them to produce more turkeys.

The average egg-laying chicken lays about 260 eggs per year, while the average turkey produces less than half of that, or about 100 eggs per year – give or take a dozen eggs or so. Also, chickens come into production at 19 to 20 weeks of age, but turkeys don’t start laying until around 32 weeks of age. And, because of their larger size, turkeys would require much more nesting room than chickens, which would make commercial coops less cost-efficient.

Image credit: http://penandfork.com

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, turkeys are far more maternal than chickens. Generations of domestication have made chicken hens rather indifferent about their offspring, they lay eggs and show little concern about their outcome. Turkeys, on the other hand go “broody” easily and want to sit on their eggs to protect and incubate them.

So while we may eat turkeys at Thanksgiving, we rarely eat turkey eggs due to their rarity and to the greater economic value of the bird over the egg.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Egg Money

One’s (butter and) egg money Fig. Money that a farm woman earns. Farm women would often sell butter and eggs for extra money that would be stashed away for an emergency. “Jane was saving her butter and egg money for a new TV. I’ve got my egg money. Let’s go shopping.” — From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Image credit apronmemories.blogspot.com

Growing and/or producing some portion of your own food supply can have liberating effects on your wallet and your life. It is a small step towards self-reliance and peace of mind, and not only are you able to feed yourself and your family, you are also sowing a more local food economy.

For some, greater control over food sources means producing their own food. For others, it’s having direct, face-to-face access to local producers. Eggzy enables both; providing tools for producers, and direct access for consumers, while emphasizing community, transparency and cost sharing.

The advantages of a small home-based business like an egg stand can be empowering. What if you aren’t able to grow your own?  Find local egg stands near you and help support a flock owner by sharing the costs of production.

 

New Feature: ‘Last Updated’

Well, you asked for it and we’ve added it, introducing the ‘update indicator’. Very simply, it’s the date of the last update made to an egg stand by it’s flock owner. There are two places where this information can now be found.

First, there’s the Egg Stand listing page,  just click on the ‘Egg Stand’ menu item and you’ll be taken to the egg stand page. You’ll see that this list is now sorted chronologically with the most recently updated egg stands at the very top.

The second place you’ll find this information is on each individual egg stand page. Just click into an egg stand, and you’ll now see the term ‘Last Updated’ under the ‘Eggs’ section. That date tells the prospective customer the last time that flock and egg data was posted.

This information is helpful in two ways; first, it helps a user who is searching for eggs in their area to identify active flocks. Second, this information is important to know to ensure the freshest eggs possible, it’s a part of the transparency of food that we’re all seeking.

Please take a look when you have a chance and tell us what you think. We really do appreciate hearing from our members, your feedback helps to inform and guide us.

Regards,
Eggzy Team

Flock Owners: 5 Good Reasons to Create an Eggzy Egg Stand

Got a backyard flock? Eggzy puts you in control. We’re building easy-to-use-tools to simplify flock management and record keeping. You control how things work – whether you share, barter or sell your eggs, Eggzy gives you the information you need.

  1. If you’re a registered Eggzy flock owner, creating an Eggzy egg stand is fast and easy (http://www.eggzy.net/flockowners)
  2. Keeping an egg stand encourages regular usage of Eggzy tools – which encourage good agricultural practices (GAP)
  3. Egg stand owners can share flock info and egg availability with others easily by way of the subscriber feature (http://www.eggzy.net/help/#posting)
  4. Egg stand owners gain exposure from press and promotions
  5. Launching an Eggzy egg stand is free to create and free to use, so why not start (or update) yours today (http://www.eggzy.net/help/#customizing)?

* This post was originally published on September 24, 2011.