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Count Your Eggs!

Count Your Eggs

We speak to lots of folks who keep chickens and the degree to which flock owners’ track flock productivity varies wildly. Some flock owners track productivity mentally, taking note of things like egg count, color and size. Others we speak to go all out and create complex spreadsheets to track things like time of day laid, size, weight and location of each egg laid for each bird!

Keeping a record of your flocks’ egg production and laying habits is actually an important part of raising healthy birds. At a minimum, it is important to keep a record of the amount of eggs laid, preferably daily. As pointed out at farmingfriends.com “Poultry can stop laying and if you know the dates that this occurs it allows you to track any changes that may have occurred such as change in feed, weather, housing, lighting or the introduction of new birds which may all effect the egg laying of poultry.”

For us at Eggzy, we also believe in the many benefits of small-scale entrepreneurship that selling your eggs can enable. What Patricia Forman calls the Home Eggri-business. By tracking how many eggs you are getting from your flock today, you can determine how much you can expect to get tomorrow and next month and so on.

Why is it so important to track your flock productivity?

  • Helps to identify disease or illness
  • Helps to compare breed productivity – which birds are better layers
  • Allows you to project how much you can sell and as such earn from eggs sales
  • Helps to determine your return on investment from the birds

When you use Eggzy to track your flock production you’re accomplishing two things at once;

  1. You’re capturing important flock behavioral habits and gathering important information that will help you to manage your flock.
  2. You’re sharing your flock info with others who are interested in any surplus that you may have to sell.

Do you count your eggs?


2 Comments Post a comment
  1. If you aren’t counting and recording it becomes nearly impossible to set a price for your eggs. “Whatever the market will bear,” doesn’t tell you whether you are making or losing money; even though you may just be a hobby raiser you should understand the real cost in dollars and cents of your eggs. If there are local farmers around where you sell are you creating fair competition or underselling those who need to make a living with their flock?

    June 27, 2012
    • mayapan #

      Thanks for bringing this up Steve, the real cost of food is an important subject to discuss!

      June 27, 2012

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