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Recipe no. 1: How to boil farm fresh eggs

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Go ahead and do a Google search for ‘how to boil an egg’ and you’d be amazed at the volume and variety of answers you get. Then again, do a search on ‘how to boil water’ and you’ll get just as many results, complete with videos and diagrams, no kidding.

Truth is, boiling farm fresh eggs requires slightly different handling than boiling regular store bought eggs. You see the fresher the egg, the more the membranes clings to the shell itself. With eggs that are just a day or two old, the outer membrane beneath the shell sticks tightly to the shell making peeling the egg almost impossible.

Original diagram found at www.exploratorium.edu

 

Directions on how to boil a farm fresh egg

  1. Start with eggs that don’t have any visible cracks
  2. Try to use eggs that are a couple of days old, say 2 to 4 days old.
    To test the freshness of an egg, place the egg in a bowl of water; an egg that lays on the bottom is fresh, an egg that stands on end is still usable, and an egg that floats should be discarded
  3. Over a high heat, bring water to a rapid boil, use a spoon to place eggs gently in boiling water one at a time – the shock of the hot water on the egg shell helps to jar the membrane from the shell – turn down heat to keep water at gentle boil.
    Please note some people suggest adding salt or vinegar to the water, I do neither as I believe it will affect the flavor of the eggs.
  4. The average size egg requires this much time for doneness:
    - Soft-boiled yolk / 4 to 5 minutes
    - Medium-boiled yolk / 6 to 7 minutes
    - Hard-boiled yolk / 12 to 15 minutes
  5. Remove pot with eggs from stove, pour out hot water and fill with cold water, let eggs cool for at least 10 minutes then drain and peel the eggs for use.
  6. To peel the egg, I prefer the rolling technique between hand and table (counter top) to crack the shell on all sides and gently loosen the layers … now remove the shell and enjoy. Refrigeration is necessary for hard boiled eggs if the eggs are not to be consumed within a few hours. Hard-cooked eggs in the shell can be refrigerated up to one week.

Food safety resources:
- http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/eggstorage.html
- http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/types/eggs/
- http://www.eggsafety.org/

21 Comments Post a comment
  1. I wanted to share briefly, what a nice blog and information you have. As you mentioned and we learned our fresh eggs boil differently.

    Hope you the blessed best you can be.
    Walter

    June 14, 2011
  2. Thank you for posting this (even though I’m just now finding it)! I didn’t think it was possible to boil a perfect egg, but your method certainly seems to have done it for me. I’m so happy, I shared it on my (Being Conformed) facebook page. :)

    June 2, 2012
  3. mayapan #

    Thanks for the note Karen – I’m so happy to hear that this technique worked for you!

    June 4, 2012
  4. Alice #

    Just tried this method to boil our eggs. So easy!!! No problems of half the egg staying attached to the shell. And most of the shell peeled off in one piece.

    June 30, 2012
  5. paieye #

    There are 2 ways in which this can be made easier:

    1. Before you put the eggs into the water, make a tiny hole in the big end of the egg with a clean needle. This will prevent the egg from cracking. If you do not fancy the needle, you can buy in any kitchen-shop or similar a made-for-the-very-purpose shell-piercer.

    2. Alternatively, put the eggs into a covered pan of COLD water; bring rapidly to a vigorous, but not rolling, boil; remove from the hob, and leave covered for the appropriate time. For a perfect, medium egg, 3½ minutes; for a hard-boiled egg, 10 minutes is ample.

    July 13, 2012
  6. Anna #

    I’ve ALWAYS had trouble getting my chickens eggs to peel well, and cooking them using your directions they peeled perfectly! A couple of them that were still a little cold from being in the fridge cracked when I first put them in the water, so maybe having them room tempurature would have helped. Thanks for the tips!

    August 22, 2012
  7. Mark #

    Just fixed a hard boiled egg following your directions. Peeled very easy, the shell was the only thing I discarded. Great advice thanks.

    September 20, 2012
  8. Cheryl #

    AMAZING: I had tried all the other scientific methods for hard boiling farm fresh eggs and none of them worked. I have not boiled any eggs for a long time because I was frustrated. SOOOO one more time I googled How to do it again and choose this site. The results wowed me I was doing the happy dance as I was peeling my eggs. Perfect, perfect, perfect. Thank you so much for sharing your idea, no fear any more…..whoooot whooooot

    November 23, 2012
    • mayapan #

      Thanks for the note Cheryl, so glad this technique worked for you!

      November 23, 2012
  9. mark #

    Directions on how to boil a farm fresh egg

    1. Start with eggs that don’t have any visible cracks

    2. Try to use eggs that are a couple of days old, say 2 to 4 days old, I have used day old eggs with great success. To test the freshness of an egg, place the egg in a bowl of water; an egg that lays on the bottom is fresh, an egg that stands on end is still usable, and an egg that floats should be discarded.

    3. Over a high heat, bring water to a rapid boil, use a spoon to place eggs gently in boiling water one at a time – the shock of the hot water on the egg shell helps to jar the membrane from the shell – turn down heat to keep water at gentle boil.

    4. The average size egg requires this much time for doneness: Soft-boiled yolk / 4 to 5 minutes – Medium-boiled yolk / 6 to 7 minutes – Hard-boiled yolk / 12 to 15 minutes

    5. Remove pot with eggs from stove, pour out hot water and fill with cold water, let eggs cool for at least 10 minutes then drain and peel the eggs for use.

    December 7, 2012
  10. I am Soooo happy to find this.
    It sure is a drag that I cant use my own eggs for boiling since they tear apart so bad. I am excited to try it.
    Thank so much! AR

    April 16, 2013
  11. Angel #

    I made my first fresh boiled eggs ever today trying this. I have heard how hard it was to boiled fresh eggs and was scared to try it. I went directly by these directions and BAM! THOSE WERE THE EASIEST EGGS TO PEEL! I have never, ever peeled a hard boiled egg so EASY! I was just absolutely amazed! I just want to say thank you. We have only had our chickens about 8 months a nd just a few weeks ago they started laying. Out of 7 hens we have more eggs than we can eat. So I am going to have to find different ways of eating eggs. Not sure because I sure am not a cook. But anyway. I will be passing this on since Im sure we will be giving so many away.
    Thank you

    May 31, 2013
  12. Hi! I just started a blog about 2 weeks ago. My blog is about cooking and gardening/backyard chickens with a little lifestyle thrown in as well. We have had chickens for about 4 yrs. now but have never heard of this method for boiling the fresh eggs. I tried it today with great success. I wanted to ask your permission to post this on my blog and of course reference you site. I am doing all the work on the blog myself so if you happen to go there… please know that I am adding, editing, and tweaking daily!!! BTW… Our back yard hen house was just featured in Mississippi Magazine. Please let me know!!!
    Thank you,
    Melissia Daggett

    July 8, 2013
    • mdt #

      Hi Melissia, Please feel free to post it and congratulations on your blog!

      July 14, 2013
  13. Thank you sooooo much for sharing :) Our hens started laying about a month ago and we are collecting a dozen eggs/day. Last week, I decided to make deviled eggs. I boiled the eggs like I normally would, not realizing that I would be unable to peel them. I knew there must be a way to peel a farm fresh egg, but my hubby said “You will just have to deal with it”. HAHAHA!!! I found your post, followed your instructions, and made the most beautiful hard-boiled eggs. I did cool them in ice water for about 3 minutes, as I was anxious to see if it worked, but cooling in cold water for 10 minutes, as you stated, would have worked perfectly. Thanks again :)

    July 22, 2013
  14. Tom Moore #

    Cant wait to try this ! Will give feedback.

    August 8, 2013
  15. Whoa!! a whole website dedicated to my favorite food – eggs!! I just got a dozen farm-fresh eggs from a friend of mine earlier today – glad I ran across this article, or I would have ruined them!!

    August 23, 2013
  16. Margie #

    Thank you thank you!!! I’ve finally have a dozen hard boiled farm fresh eggs that are perfect and delicious!

    January 20, 2014

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